Misha Mengelberg: Regeneration (1983) Soul Note

Mishe-Mengelberg-Regeneration-frontcover-1800-LJC

Selection: Herbie Nichols “2300 Skidoo”

1. Original: Herbie Nichols Trio (1955):  Herbie Nichols (piano) Al McKibbon (bass) Art Blakey (drums) recorded  Rudy Van Gelder Studio, Hackensack, NJ, May 13, 1955 Blue Note BLP 5069  The Prophetic Herbie Nichols, Vol. 2

From The Prophetic Herbie Nichols, Vol 1 & 2, two 10″ Blue Notes reissued together by King Records, Japan (1983)

Herbie-Nichols-BN-10inch-collection-cover

2. Mengelberg/Rudd/Lacy et a,l Soul Note, 1983:

3. Tight Corners: The Phillip Johnston/Jex Saarelaht Quartet reinterpret Steve Lacy’s interpretation of Nichol’s interpretation of  2300 Skidoo

Music

Regeneration: half Herbie Nichols, half Thelonious Monk.  We will return to the half Monk in another post.

2300 Skidoo is a maddeningly catchy tune typical of Nichol’s compositions, reinterpreted on this 1983 Soul Note predecessor to the 1985 Change of Season album. Nichols was master of strong melodic composition with a forceful rhythmic underpinning. His improvisation serves to embellish the melody, rather than as an opportunity for further exploration. The tune is the tune.

Roswell Rudd on trombone, replaced by George Lewis on the later album. Rudd’s career has been closely linked to friendships with both Archie Shepp and Steve Lacy, and his 1999 album Monk’s Dream was nominated for a Grammy as Best Jazz Instrumental Album. His adventurous dedication to trombone in avant gard settings deserves greater recognition. (We will come back to the trombone with a poll, shortly)

Compare-the-Interpretation with Dimitri-Shostakovich Von Meerkat, renowned musicologist and to help pay the bills, part-time insurance market analyst:

Meerkat-Professor– Both sound pretty good to me.
Anything else?
Nope
Nothing to add then?
– Do you know, people are surprised how much they can save by switching their car insurance.

Vinyl: Soul Note 1054  (Italy) stereo 117gm

Mishe-Mengelberg-Regeneration-labels-1800-LJC

Mishe-Mengelberg-Regeneration-rearcover-1800-LJC

Collectors Corner

It’s not always easy to find a specific Soul Note title in the UK. Produced in Italy, Soul Note records did not always find their way across the Channel, and that cover won’t necessarily have helped sales. Original artwork, but it still manages to look cheap.

Thanks to Ebay I tracked down a copy of Regeneration on Buy-It-Now. Ebay is a great invention. Drives us mad sometimes but for record collectors, when you are looking for a specific record, it uniquely brings buyer, seller and product together. With record shops, you are hostage to what happens to have come in. Admittedly that adds a degree of interest, as you have no idea what will turn up. My database tells me only around a third of my collection has been sourced through Ebay – two-thirds have come from physical record shops. I’m doing my bit to keep the record shops afloat.

You need hi-fi to play records, and you need records for the hi-fi to play, so equilibrium makes sense. I try to keep a balance between investment in records and hi-fi, at 50:50. Right now, recent investment in bits of kit and wire has tipped the balance towards Hi Fi. Time, I think, to buy more records. Trouble is, I have lost every bid I had on in the last couple of weeks. There are more people out there than ever with a big appetite and deep pockets. May be I should think about switching my car insurance.

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8 thoughts on “Misha Mengelberg: Regeneration (1983) Soul Note

  1. just for the record, this misha mengelberg is listed/linked in place of herbie nichols in your side menu/casting ;-D

  2. excellent record, and it sounds great. I recently received a record from Italy in an original Black Saint plastic carry bag. That bag is cherished! I love the quality of music on Black Saint and the quality of recording. Beats ECM any day.

    Ebay is tricky. Records from good sellers (Bob Djukic of this site is one) tend to go for big prices. Although I like to bid for less valuable records in a sale by a well recognized seller. I somehow believe I have a better chance.

    I end up buying most on Discogs.com. Works for me and often cheaper than Ebay. I did buy most of my vintage hifi gear on Ebay and am pleased. I would like to buy more from shops, and buy quite a bit from a store in Amsterdam, but have to say that there generally isn’t much of interest left in their inventory

  3. I’ll looking out for this too.

    You need to lay off EBay for a while. The good bricks and mortar record shops need our help in staying alive. I sometimes knowingly spend more for something in a store.

  4. This sounds the equal of the earlier CHANGE OF SEASON, LJC. Mengelberg shines. Is it as well recorded? Soul Note / Black Saint, whatever their other merits — and they are many — will probably never win any prizes for cover artwork… But what the hell — give the Italian guys their due. They stuck with recording some of the finest jazz of the late-70s, the 80s and early 90s when everyone else had either packed up and gone home or part-ex’d their instruments for synthesisers. And by the way, as Monk said: “Don’t play the piano part, I’m playing that!”

    What is you who signposted “Monk’s Advice”? http://www.listsofnote.com/2012/02/thelonious-monks-advice.html

    When you need to sell this in order to keep your wife in cheese sandwiches, you know I have first option, right.

  5. Join the lost bid club. I have created a new game wherein I predict the final price based on where the current bid is. It plots logrithmically as you get nearer to closing time.

    The challenge is that if you have been on eBay for more than 5 years, there were some good old days when prices were more reasonable and people were still cleaning out their closets. Yes, pictures weren’t readily available and descriptions of ears only existing on heads and corn fields. But scores were available for the risktakers. Now, perfect information has ruined it for us cheap bastards.

    • Collectively, the info for vintage jazz records on ebay is F A R from perfect…so you’re saying there was a time when it was even worse? And that was somehow better??

      I have this theory in the works that, as close to auction end time as, say, five minutes or so, a collectible vintage jazz record will ultimately sell for two to three times what the current bid is…I’d say no less than twice what the current bid is is usually a given.

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